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All too many times overwhelmed caregivers are physically and emotionally depleted and need to take time to rest and care for themselves. Believing in a holistic approach to caregiver stress and a strong commitment to helping our members find the right solutions, we created this blog to help you connect with others who, like you, may be facing the same eldercare issues and challenges. Feel free to comment, ask questions, and submit articles. Please forward the blog link to your family and friends. They'll be glad you did.

Warm regards,

Patricia Grace
founder & CEO
Aging with Grace

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Multiple chronic conditions increasing among the elderly

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds a dramatic increase in the number of older adults with two or more chronic conditions. The increase was seen across genders, race, and socioeconomic status.

The CDC studied the prevalence of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, current asthma, and kidney disease among adults age 65 and older over ten years. Researchers found that the number of seniors with two or more of the selected chronic conditions increased from 37.2 percent in 2000 to 45.3 percent in 2010. This change was particularly dramatic for men. In 2000, 39.2 percent of senior men had two or more chronic conditions. In 2010, this number jumped to 49 percent.

The most common combinations of chronic conditions were hypertension and diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, and hypertension and cancer. Seniors with these combinations of conditions were also likely to suffer from other chronic conditions. For example, of the 21.2 percent of seniors who suffered from hypertension and heart disease in 2010, 63.7 percent had at least one of the other seven chronic conditions as well.

Researchers believe these results are likely understating the prevalence of chronic conditions, since the study relied on respondent-reported information, not physician data, and many chronic conditions are undiagnosed. The report also emphasized the effects of this increase on our healthcare system. “Persons with multiple chronic conditions are more likely to be hospitalized, fill more prescriptions and have higher annual prescription drug costs, and have more physician visits. Out-of-pocket spending is higher for persons with multiple chronic conditions and has increased in recent years.

Read full report:

1 comment:

  1. I have been reading a book called 'Thrive Living' that talks about chronic conditions and how they are on the increase. This book's take is that most of it is due to diet, and food sensitivities. Since I have cleaned up my diet, some of my health issue have disappeared...so who knows. Maybe this is affecting the elderly too.


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